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Compelling evidence supports human to human transfer
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Author:  Cog1st [ Sat Jan 10, 2009 11:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Compelling evidence supports human to human transfer

The following can be read starting on page 2: http://www.samento.com.ec/nutranews/pdf ... 3_high.pdf

Methods of Transmission
W.T. Harvey, MD, MS, MPH and Patricia Salvato, MD of Diversified Medical Practices in Houston, Texas recently published the
article- Lyme disease: Ancient Engine of an Unrecognized Borreliosis Pandemic. They were puzzled by the high number of patients
testing positive for Lyme disease. Many of these patients presented with “established” criteria for Lyme disease, but others did not.
The fact that southeastern Texas is a ‘non-endemic’ region, and that many of the patients had no history of erythema migrans rash,
led the doctors to question established methods for Lyme disease consideration. Careful reflection of published research leads them
to conclude the following. First, the arthropod is not the exclusive vector of Lyme disease. In addition to ticks, Borrelia burgdorferi
may be carried and transmitted by fleas, mosquitos, and mites. Second, Lyme disease is not exclusively vector-borne. Compelling
evidence supports horizontal (sexual) and vertical (congenital) human to human transfer.
Other front-line physicians are arriving at the same
conclusions. “Of the more than 5,000 children I’ve
treated, 240 have been born with the disease,”
says Charles Ray Jones, MD. Dr. Jones, who is the
world’s leading pediatric specialist on Lyme
Disease, says that about 90% of his practice is
comprised of patients with the disease. He also
states, “Twelve children who’ve been breast-fed
have subsequently developed Lyme”.
University of Wisconsin researchers state that dairy cattle and other food animals can be infected with B. burgdorferi and hence
some raw foods of animal origin might be contaminated with the pathogen. Recent findings indicate that the pathogen may be
transmitted orally to laboratory animals, without an arthropod vector. Thus, the possibility exists that Lyme disease can be a food
infection.
Citing limitations of laboratory tests for the detection of antibodies to Borrelia, a study was conducted in 1995 at the University of
Vienna (Austria) for the detection of Borrelia. Utilizing polymerase chain reaction testing for DNA, Borrelia was found to be present
in both the urine and breast milk of patients previously diagnosed with Lyme disease. A study conducted at the Sacramento
(California) Medical Foundation Blood Center in 1989 states that there is evidence that the transmission of Borrelia is possible by
blood transfusion. Furthermore, in 1990, a study by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia stated that the data
demonstrates that Borrelia burgdorferi can survive the blood processing procedures normally applied to transfused blood in the
USA.
Dormancy and Activation
It is believed that years can pass before symptoms appear in a patient that has been
infected with Borrelia. In 1998, a study conducted in Switzerland demonstrated that
only 12.5% of the patients that tested positive for Borrelia developed clinical symptoms
confirming that Borrelia burgdorferi infection is often asymptomatic. A report from
Germany outlines the case of a 12 year old boy that developed Lyme Arthritis 5 years
after being bit by a tick. The case indicates that the latency period between tick bite
and onset of Lyme Arthritis may last up to 5 years.
All asymptomatic carriers of Borrelia are at risk of developing Lyme disease at some
point. Stress, an increasing health concern for physicians worldwide, may have been
the trigger that activated Lyme disease in a patient in Sweden. The case is reported
of a 26 year old woman with latent Lyme borreliosis that was concurrently activated
with a herpes simplex virus type 1 infection. Immune suppression by stress may have
caused activation of both infections.
Number of Cases
Lyme disease is the fastest-growing epidemic in the world. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. affirms
that “there is considerable underreporting” of Lyme disease, maintaining that the actual infection rate may be 1.8 million, 10 times
higher than the 180,000 cases currently reported. Nick Harris, Ph.D., Director of the International Lyme and Associated Diseases
Society (ILADS), states “Lyme is grossly under-reported. In the U.S., we probably have about 200,000 cases per year.” Dan
Kinderleher, MD an expert on Lyme disease, stated on the Today Show on June 10, 2002 that the number of cases may be 100
times higher (18 million in the United States alone) than reported by the CDC.
Jo Anne Whitaker, MD has developed a “Rapid Identification of Borrelia burgdorferi” and has over 3200 positive specimens for
Borrelia burgdorferi from forty-six (46)
states, including Alaska and Hawaii. In
addition, Dr. Whitaker has had positive
specimens from Australia, Canada, Canary
Islands, Brazil, Denmark, England, France,
Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Scotland,
Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.
Considering vector, congenital and sexual
transfer, Dr. Harvey and Dr. Salvato
estimate that 15.5% of the global
population, nearly 1 billion people, could be
infected with Borrelia.
Lee Cowden, MD states that there are very
few symptoms where one should not
consider Lyme, especially given that a
quarter of the U.S. population may be
affected. It is estimated that Lyme disease
may be a contributing factor in more than
50% of chronically ill people.
The Sierra Integrative Medicine Clinic in Reno, Nevada, states that “Authorities estimate that up to 90 percent of the population
could be carrying the Lyme spirochete and that Lyme is a factor in over 50 percent of chronic illnesses.”

Borellia Fact Sheet: http://lymedisease.org/pdf/Bbfacts.pdf

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